Thursday, November 14, 2019

Cayucos Mold Damage Company Answers The Question, 'Why Is There Mold When Nothing Is Wet?' - A-Town Daily News

Cayucos Mold Damage Company Answers The Question, 'Why Is There Mold When Nothing Is Wet?' - A-Town Daily News


Cayucos Mold Damage Company Answers The Question, 'Why Is There Mold When Nothing Is Wet?' - A-Town Daily News

Posted: 13 Oct 2019 12:00 AM PDT

mold damage Cayucos

–Mold doesn't need things to be wet in order to grow; it needs a combination of circumstances that include moisture that isn't necessarily detectable to the eye or by touch. ServPro in Cayucos, the mold damage specialist, answers the question "Why is there mold when nothing is wet" by explaining the conditions that mold needs to grow and how to prevent those conditions.

Mold is never completely eliminated because mold spores are everywhere, just waiting for the perfect conditions to grow. Mold spores need a combination of organic matter for food, moisture, warmth, and oxygen. The organic matter and moisture is the reason mold is often discovered in piles of leaves in the shade of trees in the middle of summer. The leaves provide the organic matter and the shade helps retain the level of moisture the spores need. Mold grows best in warm temperatures between 77 and 86 degrees, and this is why warm weather does not necessarily announce the end of "mold season."

The old saying: "An ounce prevention is worth a pound of cure," certainly applies to mold. Removing as much of the conditions that feed mold as possible is the best approach to preventing mold damage.

Step one is to keep all surfaces clean and dry and provide plenty of ventilation.

Start outside by removing wet damp landscaping away from the foundation of the building. Where possible, replace water-hungry shrubs and flowers drought-tolerant plants.

  • Clean up fallen leaves that can harbor mold spores. For those who like to leave fallen leaves on the ground because of the benefits to the soil, just remove those next to the foundation. Fallen leaves can be recycled as garden mulch.
  • Check the roof and exterior siding for loose shingles, boards, and cracks and make the necessary repairs.
  • Check attics, basements, crawl spaces for signs of leaks and moisture and make the necessary repairs.
  • Check under bathroom, kitchen and laundry room cabinets and check for signs of leaks and moisture around the walls and flooring near appliances and fixtures.
  • Include any stonework or masonry in the inspection.
  • Check for leaking pipes and other plumbing fixtures.
  • Clean up any mold and check for any mold or water damage. The damage can be in the form of rotted wood or crumbling drywall, stains, and serious rot damage to the structure of the building.

Call the ServPro Cayucos mold damage experts for a thorough inspection of your home or business. The ServPro team knows that mold damage can disrupt your life. The team is highly trained to clean and restore residential and commercial property for mold, damage, fire damage, water damage, smoke damage and a wide range of other situations.

ServPro Cayucos
Cayucos, CA 93430
(805) 541-1271

This press release is by San Luis Obispo SEO company Access Publishing, 806 9th Street, #2D, Paso Robles, CA 93446, (805) 226-9890.

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Fort Meade mold lawsuit targets Corvias Management-Army - Washington Times

Posted: 13 Nov 2019 02:55 PM PST

Nearly a dozen military families at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County are taking their on-post landlord to court, saying they have been forced to live in substandard homes filled with rampant mold, rotting wood and standing water.

The federal lawsuit, filed this week, targets Corvias Management-Army LLC and Meade Communities LLC, the companies that manage and operate the privatized on-base housing at Fort Meade.

"Requests for maintenance have been ignored, repair efforts when made have been substandard and slipshod attempts at cosmetic fixes have not resolved the problem," the lawsuit states. "All the while, defendants have collected the full amount of the servicemembers' housing allowances, preventing them from moving off base."

The families range from junior military members on their first tour of duty to a veteran Army colonel with almost three decades of service. They contend that Corvias forced them to live in squalor that caused and exacerbated significant health problems.

"At Fort Meade, the on-base housing has been a tremendous source of stress and harm to these servicemembers and their families as a result of defendants' actions and inactions. Defendants, on the other hand, have profited substantially from this arrangement," the lawsuit states.



The lawsuit argues there is a "pervasive" problem with mold in the housing at Fort Meade.

A Corvias spokeswoman told Stars and Stripes newspaper that the company is aware of the lawsuit, which doesn't reflect the resources and attention that has been brought to housing at Fort Meade.

Army Col. Scott Gerber noticed problems from the start in 2018 when he and his family moved into their Corvias-managed home on Fort Meade.

"They found the kitchen flooded, with water running from the kitchen into the garage," according to the lawsuit.

It was the first of several instances of water damage and mold infestation in the home. The garage tested positive for black mold, according to the lawsuit. The company eventually moved the family to another home but that one also had severe mold problems, the lawsuit states.

Col. Gerber's wife suffered a severe allergy attack while living there.

Other families listed in the lawsuit complained of severe mold with their homes. In each case, they said Corvias did little to address the problem.

The lawsuit argues that the property managers were aware of the conditions. The housing contract included a "mold addendum" families are required to sign before they move in. According to their lawyers, the addendum attempts to "downplay" the adverse health effects of mold by saying it's organically "all around us" and there is conflicting evidence that it can cause medical problems.

The lawsuit accuses the company of a variety of actionable offenses, ranging from gross negligence to breach of contract.

According to the lawsuit, the families are asking for a jury trial and want the case certified as a class-action lawsuit.

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